Monthly Archives: July 2011

Exoticism

1830’s-1920’s Inspired by revivalism, eclecticism, and a quest for novelty in the second half of the 19th century, Exoticism looks to non-Western cultures for inspiration and borrows their forms, colors, and motifs. International expositions, books, periodicals, travel, and advances in … Continue reading

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Second Empire, Rococo Revival

Second Empire: 1855-1885 Rococo Revival: 1845 – 1870 Following the defeat of Napoleon I in 1812, France remains unsettled. A series of governments, beginning with Louis XVI’s brother, neither solves problems nor resolves conflicts. An international architectural style, Second Empire … Continue reading

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Italian Renaissance, Revival

1830-1870 Italianate and Renaissance Revival of the 19th century look back to the Renaissance, the rebirth of interest in classical antiquity that appears first in Italian literature, and then in culture and art in the 14th century. The Italian Renaissance … Continue reading

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Gothic Revival

Gothic Revival consciously revives Gothic and other aspects of the Middle Ages. Beginning in England about the middle of the 18th century, it challenges the supremacy of Neoclassicism within 50 years. In its earliest manifestations, Gothic Revival applies eclectic architectural … Continue reading

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American Greek Revival, American Empire

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English Regency, British Greek Revival

1790-1840 The term Regency can refer to many periods. Politically it designates the time between 1811 and 1820 when George, Prince of Wales, serves as Prince Regent for his father who is too ill to reign. Artistically, Regency covers the … Continue reading

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German Greek Revival, Biedermeier

Early 19th century architecture in Germany and Austria continues the Neoclassical development first in the Greek Revival style, which is followed by a more eclectic approach that encompasses the Italian Renaissance, Byzantine, Early Christian, and Romanesque. The term Biedermeier applies … Continue reading

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